News

COVID-19 Live Updates: News on coronavirus in Calgary for April 20


Watch this page throughout the day for updates on COVID-19 in Calgary

Article content

What’s happening now

Advertisement 2

Article content

Advertisement 3

Article content



Tuesday

Canada to keep mask mandate for travellers after judge strikes down U.S. rule

Passengers at the nearly empty departure level of Trudeau International Airport in Montreal on December 17, 2021.
Passengers at the nearly empty departure level of Trudeau International Airport in Montreal on December 17, 2021. Photo by Pierre Obendrauf/Postmedia/File

TORONTO — Canada’s federal government said on Tuesday it has no plans to stop requiring masks on planes after a Florida judge struck down a U.S. version of the law.

“We are taking a layered approach to keeping travellers safe, and masks remain an incredibly useful tool in our arsenal against COVID-19,” a spokesperson for Canada’s Transport Minister wrote in an email.

The spokesperson confirmed masks will be required on Canadian airlines and on flights that depart from or arrive in Canada. The federal government also requires travellers to wear masks and track close contacts for 14 days after arriving in Canada.

Read more.


Tuesday

Advertisement 4

Article content

National Defence says fewer unvaccinated troops kicked out of military than reported

The Canadian Armed Forces are requiring all members to get vaccinated for COVID-19 or face dismissal.
The Canadian Armed Forces are requiring all members to get vaccinated for COVID-19 or face dismissal.

The Department of National Defence says fewer troops have been kicked out for refusing to get their vaccines than previously reported.

Defence officials told The Canadian Press in early February that 58 members of the Canadian Armed Forces had been forced to hang up their uniforms after refusing to get their COVID-19 vaccines.

But Defence Department spokesman Daniel Le Bouthillier says the number was provided in error and only 39 have been involuntarily released, with another 206 in the process of being forced out.

Read more.


Tuesday

Convoy leader Pat King charged with perjury, obstruction of justice

Pat King, an organizer of the trucker convoy protest in Ottawa.
Pat King, an organizer of the trucker convoy protest in Ottawa. Photo by Facebook

Ottawa convoy protest organizer Pat King is now facing perjury and obstruction of justice charges as he tries to secure his release from jail.

Advertisement 5

Article content

King was arrested on Feb. 18 on charges related to his involvement in the three-week protest against COVID-19 restrictions that overran the streets of Ottawa.

On Wednesday last week, King appeared in court for a bail review so his lawyers could argue for his release while he awaits his trial.

The next day, the Crown announced it would lay perjury and obstruction of justice charges against King.

Read more.


Tuesday

‘We should be able to manage:’ Provinces experiencing rise in COVID hospitalizations

Dr. Eddy Lang, professor and department head for emergency medicine at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, and head of emergency medicine for AHS in the Calgary zone.
Dr. Eddy Lang, professor and department head for emergency medicine at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, and head of emergency medicine for AHS in the Calgary zone. Photo by Courtesy Dr. Eddy Lang

Hospitals across Canada are facing a resurgence of patients with COVID-19 that some health officials say will likely continue for another month.

Latest data from the Public Health Agency of Canada shows hospitalizations due to COVID-19 rose about 18 per cent across Canada between April 4 and April 11 — to 6,020 people needing beds from 5,109.

Advertisement 6

Article content

Latest available data from the provinces shows Quebec had 2,220 people in hospital and Ontario had 1,301. There were 1,053 hospitalizations in Alberta, 403 in Saskatchewan, 158 in Manitoba and 59 in Nova Scotia.

Dr. Eddy Lang, department head of emergency medicine in Calgary for Alberta Health Services, said his province is in its sixth wave of the pandemic fuelled by the BA.2 sub-variant of Omicron, but it’s not as dramatic as the original Omicron surge.

“No one in health care would support the ‘let it rip approach,’ but in terms of hospitalization capacity, we’re not seeing the same strain in our ICU capacity as we did with (the Deltavariant)and we should be able to manage,” Lang said Monday.

He said wastewater analysis and data from the United Kingdom suggests hospitalizations could start to level off in mid-May.

Advertisement 7

Article content

Read more.


Tuesday

One-quarter of Canadians have been infected with COVID-19, poll suggests

People walk inside Yorkdale Shopping Centre in Toronto on Nov. 2020.
People walk inside Yorkdale Shopping Centre in Toronto on Nov. 2020. Photo by CARLOS OSORIO /REUTERS

Almost one in four Canadian respondents to a new online survey said they had been infected with COVID-19, while about three in four had not.

As the country grapples with its sixth wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and less data is shared with the public, the poll by Leger and the Association for Canadian Studies offers a picture of how many people have been infected.

Christian Bourque, Leger executive vice-president, said it was notable that the rate of reported infection sat higher than what the official data has suggested.

Thirty per cent of respondents aged 18 to 34 said they had been infected with COVID-19, while 12 per cent of those 55 years and older had contracted the disease.

Advertisement 8

Article content

“What was really striking was the difference when it comes to age,” Bourque said.

“It seems to match the patterns that we’re seeing, that the more social you are — going out to restaurants, bars, and concerts — makes you a little bit more vulnerable to getting the disease.”

Read more.


Tuesday

Moderna says dual variant booster with Beta more effective vs Omicron than current shot

Moderna Inc on Tuesday said a COVID-19 booster designed to target the Beta variant as well as the original coronavirus generated a better immune response against a number of virus variants including Omicron.

Moderna said the results were a good sign for the company’s plans for future shots targeting two COVID-19 variants.

Dr. Jacqueline Miller, a top Moderna scientist, said the company had no immediate plans to file for authorization of the bivalent vaccine including the Beta variant. It will submit the data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in order to lay the groundwork for a future bivalent vaccine candidate that includes the Omicron variant as a target.

The company said the bivalent vaccine with Beta generated higher neutralizing antibody titers against the Omicron variant at one and six months after the shot was given than the booster of its original vaccine currently in use.

The company said it was especially encouraging that the bivalent vaccine induced higher antibody responses against variants that were not specifically included in the vaccine.

Read more.

Advertisement 1

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

close